Tag Archives: medical tape

Rice Two-Ways

When we made the decision to go elemental in an attempt to bring about a reduction in M’s chronic symptoms, I never imagined that the reintroduction of foods would be as fraught and intensely stressful as it has proved to be. In the past 12 months we have made absolutely no progress whatsoever and everyone is stumped about what the root cause of M’s problems actually is, with opinions fluctuating between complications from his EC, “simple” multiple allergies or a physiological problem with his gut. Whilst the teams of medical professionals involved in M’s care try to decide on what direction they should follow next, I’m left stretching my ingenuity to its very limits when it comes to preparing meals for my understandably fed up 10-year-old.

mixed_rice

I’m constantly on the search for anything that will make my cooking life that tiny bit easier and a lot more interesting and love finding products that are both M-friendly and a little out of the ordinary. Like many of you I’ve eaten rice for years, but generally just as boiled rice to go with a tasty chilli con carne or egg fried from the local Chinese takeaway and had never really thought much about it. Since rice has become the staple carbohydrate of M’s diet, I’ve come to love the versatility of this ingredient and continue to be delighted by the many versions of it I’ve uncovered along the way. Rice milk, rice porridge flakes, rice cereal, rice flour, rice crackers, rice noodles, rice pasta, rice vinegar and your choice of plain rice: long grain, brown, basmati, wild or black have an overwhelming presence in my kitchen cupboards and so now do 2 rice-based products that I’ve discovered over the summer.

img_08441First are Blue Dragon Spring Roll Wrappers, which do contain a small amount of tapioca starch, but are predominantly made from rice flour. Having recently perfected my own version of lemon chicken to satisfy M’s longing for some much-missed Chinese food, these seemed like a great addition to the repertoire and I couldn’t wait to make both M and G some M-friendly pancake rolls for dinner. If you’ve never attempted to cook with these before, let me tell you that they are not the easiest ingredient to use, but I suspect that a lot more practice will make a big difference. I set up my workspace next to the kettle, filled a shallow baking dish with boiling water and then painstakingly soaked the wrappers, 1 sheet at a time, before filling them with some thinly sliced chicken, cucumber, apple and pear that I had already prepared. img_08461I cooked them in 2 different ways, interested to see which my discerning duo preferred and was very much surprised by the results when they came in. G loved the bigger roll which was just prepared as I described above, whilst M told me he’d opt for the shallow-fried triangles every time. I am thrilled that the wrappers were so well received by both children and can’t wait to see what else I can cook with them as I’m sure that they are versatile enough to be used to create some sweet treats as well as the more traditional savoury dishes.

img_11031The other is a real store cupboard essential and I can’t begin to tell you how excited I was to discover this item when I was perusing the virtual aisles of the fantastic online supermarket that is the FreeFromMarket. As for when the box of Clearspring Brown Rice Breadcrumbs arrived, nestled in the midst of my other purchases, well, Mike and the children were all summoned by my squeals of joy and then left me to my celebrations, shaking their heads sadly in complete disbelief. I am sure that there are so many ways to use the breadcrumbs in my cooking, but I started by preparing a breaded, stuffed chicken breast along the lines of a more traditional chicken kiev. I made a coconut oil and herb mix, which I carefully squeezed inside the cut I’d made in the chicken breast, before coating it liberally with the breadcrumbs. 25 minutes later and img_11091dinner was ready with a golden brown chicken breast tantalising the taste buds with both its look and its smell. They really were delicious and neither child was very willing to sacrifice a mouthful of their meal for Mum to taste-test herself. Now that the summer holidays are over and we’re heading into the autumn, roast dinners will make a more regular appearance in our household and I’m hoping to use these breadcrumbs to create an M-friendly stuffing for us all to enjoy.

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Managing a NG-tube

Formula made, it’s time to move on to what was, to me, the most daunting part of our NG-tube (NGT) journey and the bit that scares other people the most – the NGT itself.  Whilst it now feels like second nature, this was the biggest hurdle I had to overcome in my quest to become confident in managing M’s enteral feeding at home.  Let’s start with the very basics of what a NGT is and the job that it does.

The tube is a length of flexible material, which is inserted through the nose and travels down the oesophagus into the stomach with the purpose of allowing food and medicine to be placed directly there.  There are a myriad of medical reasons for a NGT to be passed and in M’s case, it was because he wasn’t able to drink the quantity of E028 needed each day due to being a reluctant drinker and the very unpalatable taste of the feed.  The NGT is measured against the child’s body before it’s inserted to make sure enough length is passed for its tip to sit comfortably within the stomach.  There are varying types and sizes of tube that can be used to allow for the age and size of the child, differing situations and the various medical needs.  M has a long-use “10 silk”, which he found to be the most comfortable to have in and can be left in place for up to 8 weeks before it needs to be changed.  Other tubes are more rigid and require changing on a weekly basis, something that just wouldn’t be practical given his current anxiety about having the tube passed and his allergic reactions to anaesthetic.

Once the tube has been passed and is in place, it is secured to the cheek using dressings and tape.  There are a number of these available and it really is a case of trying them out to see which works best for your child.  We quickly discovered that M has an allergic reaction to Duoderm and Micropore, two of the most commonly used dressings and so we’ve had to work out a method of fixing the tube to his cheek that won’t cause his face to become red and inflamed.  For us that proved to be a small strip of Tegaderm, which I then decorate using an amazing product I found on an US website called Feeding Friends.  These stickers are printed on medical tape and add some fun to the prospect of having a NGT on permanent show.  By sticking one over the top of the Tegaderm strip, M’s skin doesn’t react and he loves nothing more than choosing which friend will grace his cheek each time.  I change his tape approximately every 3 days, though we find that if it gets too wet in the bath or shower, then we need to replace it more often.

So far, so good and nothing too scary you may think, but now comes the most difficult bit, making sure that the NGT is still in the right place before starting a feed.  This is known as “aspirating” the tube and requires you to draw an amount of liquid up the tube to check that its tip is still sitting in the stomach and hasn’t become dislodged or moved during the time off the pump.  We were told to use nothing smaller than a 20mls syringe to aspirate the tube and are provided with 60mls syringes by our home delivery team.  Remembering to “kink”, or create a block in, the NGT before you start – this ensures that no air can go down the tube whilst you fiddle around with it – carefully attach the syringe to the end of the NGT and pull back on the plunger with – in my experience – your fingers tightly crossed that you can draw some of the liquid out from the stomach.  Depending on the time of day and what your child has been up to beforehand or even what, if anything, they’ve had to drink, this can prove to be something of a challenge.  It is possible for the tip to become stuck to the stomach wall, which creates a vacuum when you try to pull upon the syringe. I’ve found that sometimes it will “pop” free and a sudden flood of liquid will rush into the syringe and at other times, your gentle tugging will be met with nothing but stubborn resistance and a failure to draw even a millilitre out from the stomach.

The key thing to remember at this point is NOT TO PANIC. The first time it happened, I desperately scrabbled around in the depths of my memory to recall what advice the GOSH nurses had given, all the time attempting to resemble an oasis of calm and to impart none of my increasing anxiety to an unaware M.  There are 3 easy ways to try to resolve the problem:

  1. Give your child a glass of water to drink, wait around 15-20 minutes and then try again
  2. If the drink hasn’t helped, take a deep breath, lean your child at an angle of approximately 45° for 20 minutes before your next attempt
  3. If you still can’t aspirate the tube, get your child to lie on their left-hand side as this is where the stomach is positioned and may encourage that stubborn NGT to finally drift away from the stomach wall and allow you to test exactly where it is

If none of these has worked, or if your attempts to aspirate are causing your child discomfort, then you need to get the tube medically checked.  In our case, this meant a trip into our local A&E department, but could simply mean a phone-call to your local community nursing team or feeding team, who will be best placed to advise you on where to go and what to do next.

Courtesy of jamali4u.net

Courtesy of jamali4u.net

However, assuming you are able to aspirate the NGT with relative ease, you now need to check the pH of the liquid you’ve drawn from the tube to make sure that all is where it needs to be.  You will have been provided with pH strips as part of your enteral feeding “kit” and testing couldn’t be easier.  Simply drop some of the stomach juices on to the pads at the end of the strip and watch them change colour.  Memories of secondary school chemistry lessons come flooding back at this point and testing substances to see whether they were alkaline or acidic.  In M’s case, we are looking for a pH of 5.5 or less, indicating that the liquid drawn is acidic and therefore likely to have come from his stomach.  Always check with your nursing team what pH level is safe for your child as certain medicines are known to affect the results and an adjustment to the recommended results may be made.

Although aspirating the tube is a scary prospect, the risks associated with a misplaced tube are great.  I was lucky to be trained on all aspects of M’s NGT whilst we were in GOSH, but even then found the first few attempts a frightening prospect.  The most important lesson I learned was to “kink” his tube every time I did anything with it and now I don’t even think twice about doing it – it’s just another step in the process of starting his pump feeds. Once it’s confirmed that the NGT is correctly positioned, tube feeding can now begin, but that, I fear, is a lesson for another day!